Only the shallow know themselves.

Only the shallow know themselves. God knows; I won't be an Oxford don anyhow. I'll be a poet, a writer, a dramatist. Somehow or other I'll be famous, and if not famous, I'll be notorious. Or perhaps I'll lead the life of pleasure for a time and then—who knows?—rest and do nothing. What does Plato say is the highest end that man can attain here below? To sit down and contemplate the good. Perhaps that will be the end of me too.

A blog entirely dedicated to Oscar Wilde's genius.

Reblogged from moriarty221b

moriarty221b:

Did I ever talk about my passion for Oscar Wilde face? 

"Those who find ugly meanings in beautiful things are corrupt without being charming. This is a fault. Those who find beautiful meanings in beautiful things are the cultivated. For those there is hope."

Reblogged from inmemoriaeexamoris

Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray (via inmemoriaeexamoris)

mirabim:

It’s Oscar Wilde’s grave, in Paris (père Lachaise cemetery)

Reblogged from mirabim

mirabim:

It’s Oscar Wilde’s grave, in Paris (père Lachaise cemetery)

"'The heart contains passion but the imagination alone contains poetry,' says Charles Baudelaire. This too was the lesson that Theophile Gautier, most subtle of all modern critics, most
fascinating of all modern poets, was never tired of teaching -
‘Everybody is affected by a sunrise or a sunset.’ The absolute
distinction of the artist is not his capacity to feel nature so
much as his power of rendering it."

Reblogged from colorin-productions

'The English Renaissance of Art', Oscar Wilde (via colorin-productions)

"He was so fond of being many-sided that among his sides he even admitted the right side. He loved so much to multiply his souls that he had among them one soul at least that was saved. He desired all beautiful things - even God."

Reblogged from wildeanwithoutaclue

G. K. Chesterton on Oscar Wilde (via wildeanwithoutaclue)

"I am too fond of reading books to care to write them."

Reblogged from observando

Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray (via observando)

Reblogged from barbaric-yawping

"Women have a wonderful instinct about things. They can discover everything except the obvious."

Reblogged from badflingwithagoodgirl

An Ideal Husband by Oscar Wilde (via badflingwithagoodgirl)

"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others whenever they go."

Reblogged from tksween

Oscar Wilde (via tksween)

cassandrajohnstone:

Gothic Novel Pin-ups: DORIAN GRAYfrom Oscar Wilde’s “The Picture of Dorian Gray”

Reblogged from cassandrajohnstone

cassandrajohnstone:

Gothic Novel Pin-ups: DORIAN GRAY
from Oscar Wilde’s “The Picture of Dorian Gray”

"I knew that I had come face to face with some one whose mere personality was so fascinating that, if I allowed it to do so, it would absorb my whole nature, my very soul, my very art itself."

Reblogged from funeralforafriendloveliesbleedin

Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray (via funeralforafriendloveliesbleedin)

"Never regret thy fall,
O Icarus of the fearless flight
For the greatest tragedy of them all
Is never to feel the burning light."

Reblogged from ourselvesimmortally

Oscar Wilde (via thishatterismad)

c4ss:

Originally circulated in 1891 as a privately printed book, by the world-renowned gay Anglo-Irish Aesth­et­icist poet, play­wright and critic Oscar Wilde (1854-1900). Wilde declared himself an anarchist following his encounter with the Russian expatriate anarchist Peter Kropotkin. His artistic work, and his later persecution, trial and imprisonment for his sexual relationships with male lovers were widely and sympathetically discussed in the Anarchist press during the 1890s, and his Anarchist writings were later reprinted by Emma Goldman and Alex­ander Berkman’s Mother Earth publishing company. The essay offers a fascinating exploration of the cultural impacts of anarchistic socialism and individualism — not as a tearing-down of all in the name of rigidly formal equality, but rather a liberating opportunity for all to fully express what makes them unique, and and flourish in their idiosyncrasy.

“We are often told that the poor are grateful for charity. Some of them are, no doubt, but the best amongst the poor are never grateful. They are un­grate­ful, dis­con­tent­ed, disobedient, and rebellious. They are quite right to be so. Charity they feel to be a ridiculous­ly in­ade­qu­ate mode of partial rest­it­ut­ion, or a sentimental dole, usually ac­com­panied by some im­pert­i­n­ent attempt of the senti­mentalist to tyrannise over their private lives. Why should they be grateful for the crumbs that fall from the rich man’s table? Dis­obe­d­ience is man’s original virtue. It is through dis­obed­ience that pro­gress has been made, through dis­obed­ience and through rebellion… .
“It is clear, then, that no Authoritarian Socialism will do. … Under an industrial bar­rack sys­tem, or a system of economic tyranny, nobody would be able to have any such freedom at all. Every man must be left quite free to choose his own work. No form of compulsion must he ex­er­c­is­ed over him… . All association must be quite voluntary. It is only in vol­unt­ary associations that man is fine. … Socialism itself will be of value simply because it will lead to Individualism.
“Art is Individualism, and Individ­u­alism is a disturbing and disintegrating force. Therein lies its immense val­ue. For what it seeks to disturb is monotony of type, slavery of custom, tyr­an­ny of habit, and the reduction of man to the level of a machine… . Self­ish­ness is not living as one wishes to live, it is asking others to live as one wishes to live. And unselfishness is letting other people’s lives alone, not interfering with them. Selfishness always aims at creating around it an absolute uniformity of type. Unselfishness re­cog­nises infinite variety of type as a delightful thing, accepts it, acquiesces in it, enjoys it.”

Support C4SS With Oscar Wilde’s “The Soul of Man Under Socialism”

Reblogged from c4ss

c4ss:

Originally circulated in 1891 as a privately printed book, by the world-renowned gay Anglo-Irish Aesth­et­icist poet, play­wright and critic Oscar Wilde (1854-1900). Wilde declared himself an anarchist following his encounter with the Russian expatriate anarchist Peter Kropotkin. His artistic work, and his later persecution, trial and imprisonment for his sexual relationships with male lovers were widely and sympathetically discussed in the Anarchist press during the 1890s, and his Anarchist writings were later reprinted by Emma Goldman and Alex­ander Berkman’s Mother Earth publishing company. The essay offers a fascinating exploration of the cultural impacts of anarchistic socialism and individualism — not as a tearing-down of all in the name of rigidly formal equality, but rather a liberating opportunity for all to fully express what makes them unique, and and flourish in their idiosyncrasy.

“We are often told that the poor are grateful for charity. Some of them are, no doubt, but the best amongst the poor are never grateful. They are un­grate­ful, dis­con­tent­ed, disobedient, and rebellious. They are quite right to be so. Charity they feel to be a ridiculous­ly in­ade­qu­ate mode of partial rest­it­ut­ion, or a sentimental dole, usually ac­com­panied by some im­pert­i­n­ent attempt of the senti­mentalist to tyrannise over their private lives. Why should they be grateful for the crumbs that fall from the rich man’s table? Dis­obe­d­ience is man’s original virtue. It is through dis­obed­ience that pro­gress has been made, through dis­obed­ience and through rebellion… .

“It is clear, then, that no Authoritarian Socialism will do. … Under an industrial bar­rack sys­tem, or a system of economic tyranny, nobody would be able to have any such freedom at all. Every man must be left quite free to choose his own work. No form of compulsion must he ex­er­c­is­ed over him… . All association must be quite voluntary. It is only in vol­unt­ary associations that man is fine. … Socialism itself will be of value simply because it will lead to Individualism.

“Art is Individualism, and Individ­u­alism is a disturbing and disintegrating force. Therein lies its immense val­ue. For what it seeks to disturb is monotony of type, slavery of custom, tyr­an­ny of habit, and the reduction of man to the level of a machine… . Self­ish­ness is not living as one wishes to live, it is asking others to live as one wishes to live. And unselfishness is letting other people’s lives alone, not interfering with them. Selfishness always aims at creating around it an absolute uniformity of type. Unselfishness re­cog­nises infinite variety of type as a delightful thing, accepts it, acquiesces in it, enjoys it.”

Support C4SS With Oscar Wilde’s “The Soul of Man Under Socialism”

Reblogged from morganrjaffe

"What a silly thing love is…it is not half as useful as logic, for it does not prove anything, and it is always telling one of things that are not true. In fact, it is quite unpractical."

Reblogged from allbetterthanmisery

The Nightingale and the Rose, Oscar Wilde (via allbetterthanmisery)